Diamine Crimson

Manufacturers since 1864, Diamine Inks relocated to this purpose built ‘state of the art’ factory in Liverpool in 1925, where they successfully carried on using the traditional methods and formulas for ink production. Over the years the company has changed hands and are now located close to the world famous Aintree Race Course

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Ink splash

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Diamine Crimson used to be one off my favorite red inks. Some time ago I bought new bottle and I’m just not sure what’s going on. The color lacks saturation it used to have. It feathers terribly on absorbent papers. Drying time is great but comes at a cost of significant bleedthrough.

I’m strongly disappointed with new batch(?) of the ink.

 

Drops of ink on kitchen towel

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Color ID

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Color range

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Oxford, Platinum Plaisir, medium

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Leuchtturm 1917, Platinum Plaisir, medium

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Moleskine, Platinum Plaisir, medium

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3 thoughts on “Diamine Crimson

  1. I imagine that using Crimson on the very thin paper one can have an extra copy of the notes on the second sheet of paper 🙂 On Moleskine, on the other hand, ink looks completely dissolved.

    Liked by 2 people

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